QUERCC

Quantifying, Understanding and Enhancing Relational Continuity
of Care

Workshop discussion on relational continuity of care, Friday 24th November 2023

The Exchange building in Birmingham

We are hosting workshop including patients, primary care staff (general practitioners and others) and researchers to discuss relational continuity of care. We want to understand what patients, clinicians and researchers mean when they think of continuity of care. This might be seeing one doctor, seeing a small group of doctors or it could mean having a regular specialist nurse. We expect different patients, clinicians and researchers may have differing understandings about what continuity of care means.

 

The workshop is being hosted in The Exchange in central Birmingham, a short walk from New Street station. We will provide lunch and can reimburse travel expenses. We start at 12 noon for lunch, the workshop starts at 1pm. We expect to be working together as a group for around 2 hours. 

 

Second workshop discussion

For general practices to know how well they are delivering continuity of care, they need to measure it. There are several different continuity of care scores which can be calculated from the pattern of consultations. But these scores measure different types of continuity of care. After we have established what patients and clinicians mean by continuity of care, in a second workshop we will discuss show well the different continuity of care scores measure different types or understandings of continuity of care identified in the first workshop.

November workshop on relational continuity of care: a huge success

Thirty people, representing patients, a range of health care staff and researchers took part in our workshop in late November 2023. They included a wide range of ages, ethnicities, educational and professional backgrounds, and experiences as patients and as carers. There were lively debates in the small groups and many common themes emerged. Participants shared these when the whole group came together again. Themes included trust between doctor and patient, the way continuity helped efficiency, and the importance of the patient’s choice. We will write up our findings in a research. Our facilitators, New Possibilities produced a colourful graphic, giving a flavour of the discussions.


Tom Marshall, the lead researcher observed. ‘We were taken by surprise by the interest in the workshop. On the day, we didn’t even have enough chairs and had to borrow some from another room!’


The thoughts from this workshop will help inform our second workshop on measuring continuity of care. This will be on 20th February 2024, also in The Exchange.

Map of themes related to continuity of care from the first workshop

Measuring continuity of care: workshop in The Exchange, February 2024

We are hosting a second workshop on continuity of care on 20th February 2024. This will focus on how to measure continuity of care in general practices.


For general practices to know how well they are delivering continuity of care, they need to measure it. There are several different continuity of care scores, which are calculated from the pattern of consultations. But these scores measure different types of continuity of care.


We want to know which continuity of care scores our participants think best describe continuity. We will ask participants about a number of different scenarios where patients consult GPs several times. We would like to understand which scenario patients think is higher continuity. This will help us to choose a continuity of care score which matches with what patients think.


Here is an example. In scenario one a patient consults 10 times and sees the same GP six times but sees four different GPs in the four other consultations. Six out of 10 consultations were with one GP, but they saw a total of five different GPs. In scenario two a patient consults 10 times and sees one GP five times and another GP five times. Only five out of 10 consultations were with one GP, but on the other hand they only saw two different GPs. 

Two different scenarios in measuring continuity of care in a GP surgery
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